Sunday, July 10, 2005

On Location!!! - Kuching - Fish Burger @ Sugarbun, Satok

Ladies and gentlemen, we think we have found the best fish burger!! A friend was talking about his childhood and how he loved it when his parents brought him to Sugarbun to have a meal. He said that he would always order the fish burger. So, as the Makan Kings, we just had to go find out how good it was. This particular branch of Sugarbun was in Satok.



The set (picture above) comes with one soft drink (root beer in this case). Doesnt look particularly interesting but its the content that counts right??





The fish burger was wrapped in a paper bag. Upon tearing the paper bag, we found the fish burger wrapped in another layer of grease proof paper. This fish burger is long. Unlike the square variety that another fast food outlet offers. (Hint: Blue wrapper and golden arches)



On first bite, the fish burger was amazing!! The fish fillet used was similar to those used for cheaper fish and chips. The fillet was deep fried to perfection. The flaky fish fillet tasted very good and had a welcomed peppery taste to it as well.
Instead of your normal tartar sauce or mayonnaise, they used coleslaw instead. The coleslaw used was not your normal coleslaw in that the vegetables were minced up finely. A refreshingly good idea!! The burger also had the mandatory cucumber slices but was surprised to find that there was no tomato slices. The bun used also was good!! Soft and warm!!
This fish burger is so good that there is no need to add chilli or tomato sauce to it. It is perfect just on its own!!

Makan Kings ratings = 8.5 out of 10

-Makan Kings-

12 Comments:

Blogger babe_kl said...

i wonder the KL branches are as good?

12:19 PM, July 11, 2005  
Anonymous Penang Kia said...

Never tried before sugarbun .... is there any sugarbun in KL ?? A few yrs back i still see sugarbun, but now hardly. Dont think penang have any sugarbun.

2:11 PM, July 11, 2005  
Anonymous Tomitachi said...

Haha .... Sugarbun reminds me of many many other historical fast food like White Castle, Grannys, Marry brown and others ......

2:24 PM, July 11, 2005  
Blogger boo_licious said...

The sugarbun in ss2 closed down before I could even try them. Looks like the only other place is the one in Jln Bukit Bintang.

3:44 PM, July 11, 2005  
Blogger Makan Kings said...

babe - No idea where the KL branches are. As boo says, there's one in Bukit Bintang but have never been there so cant confirm

penang kia - No idea. Maybe you can try Bukit Bintang as said by boo.

tomitachi - Yea, all these are local fast food chains. There is actually a Marry Brown in Kuching. Saw it once. Will go have a look see!

boo - Thanks for the info for Sugarbun in KL. Hope there is still at least one branch. Everyone should try this fish burger.

4:56 PM, July 11, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Y this kind of stuff cannot found in PENANG wan....???

sien nya.

4:02 PM, July 12, 2005  
Blogger Makan Kings said...

anonymous,

Penang has other good food that more than makes up the lack of certain types of food!!

Cheers,
-Makan Kings-

4:28 PM, July 12, 2005  
Blogger boo_licious said...

I just went to Jalan Bukit Bintang yesterday and it looks like that Sugarbun outlet has also closed down. I guess the food just did not take off with the locals.

2:13 PM, July 17, 2005  
Blogger Makan Kings said...

boo,

Aww. That is too bad. The fish burger is really quite good. Cant say anything about the other stuff on offer as we have not tried anything else there.

Cheers,
-Makan Kings-

5:03 PM, July 18, 2005  
Blogger Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net korean food kimchi
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.

6:59 PM, November 10, 2005  
Blogger Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net korean food online
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.

9:58 AM, November 11, 2005  
Blogger Charles said...

Gosh...back in 2005 it was a battered fish in side the bun ???>..the one they served in 2010 is just a tiny fish fillet though

12:56 AM, January 25, 2010  

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